Morals and Values: To Kill A MockingBird

1057 Words5 Pages
How values influence ethical and moral decisions

Have you ever faced a difficult decision? Every day, we have to make decisions. Some of these decisions can be simple, but others can raise moral or ethical dilemmas. How does one go about making these moral or ethical decisions? People have value systems that can influence the moral or ethical decisions they make. This is clearly illustrated in the book Of Mice and Men, by John Steinbeck, through the main character, George Milton and his interaction with his companion, Lennie. Steinbeck shows how George’s value system influences his moral and ethical decisions when George shows his care for Lennie, when he helps Lennie resolve his conflicts with other people, and when Lennie
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Similarly, Lennie can be a nuisance to George because he is constantly getting into trouble. And when Slim asks why George still has him, George says, “…you get used to goin’ around with a guy an’ you can’t get rid of him”. Like Candy and his dog, George has been with George for too long that now simply they are used to each other. Candy had to let his dog go because it was best for the dog. However, he let someone else kill his dog and Candy later tells George, “I ought to of shot that dog myself George. I shouldn’t ought to of let no stranger shoot my dog.”George on the other hand, didn’t want anyone to hurt Lennie and knew that he must kill Lennie himself. The ethical decision here is that it is wrong to kill someone and technically, George is breaking the law. The moral part in George’s decision is that if George doesn’t kill him, then Lennie will be tortured and man-slaughtered by Curley. Also, George makes sure that Lennie dies in happiness by having him first think about the plan of getting a farm and tending to rabbits before George kills Lennie. Steinbeck portrays George as a person who has values defines who he is. Steinbeck had shown that George values companionship, responsibility, and loyalty while he fosters Lennie. Steinbeck shows how George’s value system influences George’s moral and ethical decisions when George shows his care for Lennie,
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