Motivational Theory in Practice at Tesco

2522 WordsJul 28, 201411 Pages
Motivational theory in practice at Tesco Curriculum Topics • Motivation • Taylor’s theory • Mayo effect • Maslow and Herzberg Introduction Tesco began in 1919 with one man, Jack Cohen, a market stallholder selling groceries in London. TESCO was formed out of a merger with T.E. Stockwell from whom he purchased tea for sale on the stall. The first store opened in 1929. Since then, Tesco has expanded across the world. It now has over 2,200 stores including hypermarkets and Tesco Express outlets to meet different customer needs. As a conglomerate Tesco also offers alternative goods and services such as insurance, banking and online shopping. With net profits of around £3.4 billion Tesco has become the largest British retailer and one of…show more content…
At Tesco a motivated member of staff ‘works in partnership with others to achieve individual and team objectives’. This means that he or she focuses on customers, treats people fairly and is determined and devoted to receiving feedback from others. Tesco’s Employee Reward Programme has some similarity to Taylor’s theory. Its financial reward packages are one motivating factor. However, there are factors other than money which motivate people in both their personal and working lives. Tesco goes far beyond Taylor and gives more than just simple pay increases. It supports the varied lifestyles of individual employees through relevant and targeted benefits. Many non-financial factors can and do motivate employees to improve their output. One such factor may be the desire to serve people; others may be to improve personal skills or achieve promotion. A person may be motivated to be a professional footballer not because of the salary but because they love football. Tesco rewards for hard work Taylor’s motivational theory In 1911 the engineer Frederick Taylor published one of the earliest motivational theories. According to Taylor’s research, people worked purely for money. In the early years of the car assembly industry, work on a production line was based on producing quantity and was repetitive. Workers were paid ‘piece rate’, that
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