Mount Everest Case

1432 Words6 Pages
[pic] Executive Summary: The Mount Everest case can be summed up as inefficient distribution of leadership, skills and resources in the face of imminent natural disaster. Teamwork consist of interdependency, mutual accountability and understanding common goals and working with respect to each other’s complementary skills. Effective team’s consist of understanding perceptions of others and help motivate each other to continually work towards the common goal. Working towards a goal in a team usually does not run a straight course. In order to offset these issues that can come into play one may need to optimistically receive suggestions, abstain from narrow perceptions and outlook and trust on the team. Trust helps to…show more content…
Overlap in roles creates conflict, wasted effort, and unintended redundancy. When climbers began to feel too sick to continue their trip up the mountain, they were lead down by either a Sherpa or a lower ranking guide. However when Dr. Dale Kruse began to feel too ill to continue, he was led down by group leader Scott Fischer. It was definitely not expected of a leader to take up chores of the lower ranked guide when his expertise is required for more crucial situations .Scott’s decision lead to resentment among his clients. Recommendation: The right structure will enhance team performance. Firstly, if a team wants to improve the performance, it needs to develop the right mix of expertise. Its means each member should focus on his or her best ability area, which that makes the team to save time and improve efficiency. A high-performing teams develop a common commitment to working relationships” (Bolman and Deal, pp.108). Team members should clearly understand who will do what jobs, how to make decisions and the skills need to develop in the team. Also “High-performing teams translate common purpose into specific, measurable performance goals.” (Bolman and Deal, pp.107).Which means all team members should have a common goal, and analysis whether the goal is specific and measurable. A detailed goal is more powerful and useful for all team members. Analysis of the scenario
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