Ms. Singleton And The Civil Rights Act Of 1964

2117 WordsMar 27, 20179 Pages
In this case, I would favor in light of Ms. Singleton. Likewise, Ms. Singleton had undergone much repeated inappropriate conduct, including many sexually suggestive comments and propositions. Therefore, Ms. Singleton brought an action against her employer. Ms. Singleton claimed the sexual harassment almost immediately took place shortly after beginning her job. Essentially, she was not given prompt and reasonable care in regards to her complaint of alleged sexual harassment and retaliation in violation of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, the misconduct complained about took place approximately four times a week. Moreover, her complaint did not allege that her employer took any tangible employment action…show more content…
Thus, an employer violates Title VII when the workplace is filled with discriminatory sex-based intimidation, ridicule, and insult that is sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of the victim 's employment and create an abusive working environment. In order to establish that she has an actionable claim for sexual harassment in the workplace under Title VII, Mrs. Singleton was required to exhibit that the offensive conduct was unwelcome, was based on her sex, was sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of her employment and create an abusive work environment, and was imputable to her employer (Wellington-James, 2015). Essentially, the case could go in light of the defendant. Despite the fact that Ms. Singleton did not prove that the offending conduct was sufficiently severe or pervasive to alter the conditions of her employment. Generally, we determine whether a work environment is sufficiently hostile by looking at all the circumstances, including the frequency of the discriminatory conduct; its severity; whether it is physically threatening or humiliating, or a mere insulting statement, and whether it unreasonably interferes with an employee 's work performance. It is established that simple teasing, offhand comments, and isolated incidents will not amount to discriminatory changes in the terms and conditions of employment. Title VII is not intended to serve as a workplace civility code. After careful review, we

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