Much Ado About Nothing Essay: Beatrice, Benedick, and Love

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Beatrice, Benedick, and Love in Much Ado About Nothing


William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing is set in thirteenth century Italy. The plot of the play can be categorized as comedy or tragicomedy . Villainy and scheming combine with humor and sparkling wordplay in Shakespeare's comedy of manners. Claudio is deceived into believing that Hero, is unfaithful. Meanwhile, Benedick and Beatrice have "a kind of merry war" between them, matching wits in repartee. This paper will attempt to present the fact that Beatrice and Benedick are in love during the entire play despite their witty rivalries. Their friends' schemes lead each to think that the other is in love, which allows the true affection between them which leads to the
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Marry, once before he won it of me with false dice, therefore your grace may well say I have lost it. (II.i.257-64)

“The jilting they are referring to here ended nothing, as both are well aware, since each is a great nihilist. Much Ado About Nothing is certainly the most amiably nihilistic play ever written and is most appositely titled. With every exchange with the fencing lovers, the abyss glitters, and their mutual wit does not so much defend against other selves as it defends against meaninglessness. They make much ado about nothing because they know that nothing will come of nothing, and so they speak again. Beatrice will always win, or rather, win what can be won, since she is much the wittier, formidable as Benedick can be” (Bloom 192).

They are fascinated by each other, and Shakespeare gives us a tantalizing hint of an earlier relationship between them; responding to Don Pedro’s "Come, lady, come, you have lost the heart of Signor Benedick," Beatrice says, "Indeed, my lord, he lent it me a while, and I gave him use (interest) for it, a double heart for his single one. Marry, once before he won it of me, with false dice."

“The title Much Ado About Nothing, with its openness to wordplayon ‘noting’, foreshadows a central device in the play’s technique, its constant use of overhearings” (Palmer 124). Along with “overhearings” netting is an important motif too. Don John…