Museum Report on "Houses of Parliament: Effect of Fog, London" by Claude Monet

728 Words Jan 20th, 2014 3 Pages
Museum Report
1. St. Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts, September 28, 2013, 11:00AM
2. Houses of Parliament: Effect of Fog, London
3. Claude Monet
4. 1904
5. Impressionism
6. Primarily cool blues with hints of green to enhance the subject, mostly a very light sky-blue mixed with white, progressing all the way to pale cerulean. The effect of fog detailed in the scene mutes the colors, lending the sfumato effect to the whole piece.
7. Landscape
8. Self; this and many others of the Palace of Westminster series were begun during his stay in St. Thomas’ Hospital and finished in his studio in Giverny.
9. Oil on canvas
10. Smooth
11. Due to the physical setting of the piece, there is light streaming through the space between Monet’s
…show more content…
Splitting from the tradition, Monet painted the same image several times over, at different times of the day, under changing weather conditions, and rather than finishing them all on the spot, had them taken back to France, sometimes with photographers to refresh the memory of the scenes. This caused some upset, though the quality of his work still had not declined. Exceptionally enough, this piece dates to before his development of cataracts and subsequent removal operations (causing him to see more vivid hues of blue), and the paints are still blended masterfully to give a rendition of fog cover on the riverbanks.
16. “Permanent Collection.” Museum of Fine Arts, Web. 29 September 2013. .

“Claude Oscar Monet Biography” Claude Monet: The Complete Works. 2002-2013. www.claudemonetgallery.org. 29 Sept. 2013
17. On my museum experience, I took it in like every other visit to the museum I have ever had: much like other children expressed wonder and amazement at a circus performance or sports game; I was awestruck and mesmerized by the colors, the atmosphere, and the same restrained joy that I felt evident in the eyes of all the other observers. My girlfriend and I made our way through the museum, blending in with crowds of other viewers to see Cezanne, Gauguin, Brueghel, O’Keefe and the like in the permanent collection, making time to go from one end of the spectrum to the other. But my heart has always had a soft spot for…