Music History and Its Influence on America

2401 WordsNov 6, 200810 Pages
Music History And Its Influence On America Rodriguez Pg. 1 Seven o' clock strikes on my alarm clock, causing it to ring its silver bells, rudely jolting me back to reality from another wonderful dream. Groggily, I manage to carry my body to the shower, still upset that i won't be able to find out if I had kissed that cute girl or not, and still wondering who the man in the peacoat was that was following us around on our date. Thirty minutes later, I've gathered my books, I've dressed myself, I've eaten, and I'm on my way out the door to my car. I'm still tired and still upset about the deleted scene from my dream. I put the key into the ignition, and i immediately feel better as My Love by Justin…show more content…
Emphasis on people's rights and the ability to shape the environment was sought out. The American and the French Revolution were momentous events during this period. People's view of the world and their relationship to it began to go through major change. Music was viewed as an innocent luxury, and composers had to react to an increased demand for songs. Many people started to express their emotions in their songs. ( Essentials of Music.) The Romantic Era (1825-1900) was formed by a clearer understanding of the world and a human's place in it, which changed the way people thought of everything and everyone. Many parts of Europe tried to free themselves from its foreign rulers. Music started to tell stories, represent people, express ideas of philosophy, and to highlight national identities. Composers began to incorporate ethnic influences in their music, and musicians looked at it as a calling rather than an occupation. ( Essentials of Music.) European music is where the search for American music's beginnings would be found. Louis Charles Elson, author of The History of American Music states that when the Pilgrims and English settlers found their destination ( New England), they had their religious songs that they sang, but made no attempts to change them. They would not accept any alterations to establish any new music to adapt to their new surroundings. All they did was mimic what they had learned in
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