My Bondage And My Freedom And Frederick Douglass Analysis

1701 WordsNov 22, 20177 Pages
Authors often exaggerate or revise small details of their own books in order to produce an emotion in the reader instead of a factual representation. However, this does not make authors to be liers, only fabricators. In times or social unjust it is necessary for the oppressed to voice their opinions for the purpose of gaining equality. As it may seem immoral to twist truths, if done correctly it will strengthen the author's message, without compromising the authenticity of the plot. One can see this in The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, along with his, My Bondage and My Freedom. Both novels are accounts of Douglass’ troublesome journey from a slave to a freeman. These heroic accounts served as prominent and respected…show more content…
He was a genuine African, and had inherited some of the so called magical powers, said to be possessed by African and eastern nations.”(158). Douglass alludes to the fact that Sandy possesses some kind of magical capacity, different from his narrative where he rejected such beliefs. Through using David Blight as a lens one may observe a shift of Douglass’ intentions in order to put a greater emphasis his own on African beliefs for the purpose of bringing freedom to his brethren. In Blight’s introduction he makes the observation, “Readers will find many influences of the Garrisonian doctrines, especially the attacks on religious hypocrisy and the remarkable moment in chapter two when Douglass compares trusted slaves who pleased overseers with the slaves of political parties ... the book is as much an abolitionist polemic as it is a revealing autobiography” (10). Blight’s remarks direct one to consider that Douglass was pursuing two causes, the abolitionist cause as well as his own. In pursuing the former, in 1845 Douglass was still associated with Garrison, by later accentuating other slaves as knowledgeable and in touch with their roots, in My Bondage and My Freedom, Douglass elucidates the African race as compassionate men rather than brutes. Such an argument leads to the conclusion Africans are well overdue for their freedom. Through examination of both documents one can see an evident transformation in
Open Document