My Study Of Landscapes And Landscape Theory

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The sublime when involved specifically within nature and landscapes, concerns itself with representing a dark scene that usually shows the uncontrollable power of nature. ‘The focus on storms as moments when the sleepy grandeur of nature is stirred up… arouses the inner force of the subject… and laid the groundwork of the sublime tradition’. (B.Beckley, 2001) This became my main area of focus for my work; to create a series of paintings showing the power and unpredictability of nature over a landscape. In my previous project I began my study of landscapes by focussing on our everyday surrounding and variances in landscapes being dependant on individuals social and cultural differences. In Landscape Theory, Jackson suggests landscapes…show more content…
This contradicts my intentions of representing the sublime in nature. This directed my work into a more focussed outcome; to show landscape that represents both the picturesque’s control and the sublimes unpredictability. I started to experiment with various maps, specifically a familiar landscape for me (where I grew up), and how I could incorporate or contrast these with the sublime in landscape. I see the maps within my work as a way to represent order, and so experimented with various methods in layering over the top to cover the controlled element in a free manner to represent the uncontrollable aspects of the sublime creating contrast. The direction for my work was initially inspired by my research into David Hockneys paintings in the previous term. David Hockney uses colour theory to determine his choice of contrasting and complementary palette in his paintings. This unique style, paired with the vast scale of most of his work, creates an immersion for the viewer into the landscape being depicted. I wanted to recreate this within my work with scale but also colour palette. I had little concern with specific use of colour theory, but experimented with blocks of bold, bright colours to create the landscape; while leaving enough visual connections to allow the viewer to depict an aerial view or map of a landscape. While reading I came across an article using the phrase ‘degree of abstraction’. Although the article had no connection
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