My Top Leadership Strength As Determined By The Survey

1034 WordsFeb 7, 20175 Pages
Perspective My top leadership strength as determined by the survey is Perspective, which best relates to how I think and make decisions, whether alone or in group. Having perspective forces an individual to always be able to always develop a new view, a new understanding and perhaps new ideas. Every individual interprets the world through their own lens, based on experience, education, and any number of other factors – therefore why not expand upon this daily occurrence to make decisions based off personal experiences? It gives an individual the aptitude to process scenarios they hadn’t seen and understand people in ways they hadn’t initially considered. It helps one focus on new ways to be more effective because. When we are encouraged…show more content…
– Have I recognized that there is likely more than one right answer or option to consider? – Am I seeing complexities that we might not have initially noticed. – We might be able to see connections and even simple solutions that escaped us initially. – How many options that we can compare? – Will these options help make sharpers decisions? Can I handle having to choose between more options? – In the long run will I build better relationships with others as they realize we are empathetic and really looked at a situation in a variety of different ways? Humility Number two on my results is an important leadership trait that’s often overlooked. Humility is the opposite of arrogance, an attitude that can severely damage our reputation and relationships with others. Humility is defined as “a modest or low view of one 's own importance (Merriam-Webster),” and “self-restraint from excessive vanity (Oxford).” Humility stems from our inner sense of self-worth. Humble leaders are grounded by their beliefs, their values, and the principles by which they lead. Ultimately, they know that to lead is to serve their customers, employees, investors, communities, and ultimately, society through their work. Humble leaders seek input from others to ensure they have all the truths and are making decisions that are in the best interest of an organization. If you think you do, then it’s probably time to reassess. People want to work for people who value their
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