National Hockey League a Retail Prospective Essay

2473 Words Oct 28th, 2015 10 Pages
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NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE ENTERPRISES CANADA: A
RETAIL PROPOSAL

Elizabeth Gray prepared this case under the supervision of Elizabeth M.A. Grasby solely to provide material for class discussion.
The authors do not intend to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a managerial situation. The authors may have disguised certain names and other identifying information to protect confidentiality.
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Additionally, each NHL team employed its own marketers who were responsible for promoting the team and selling tickets to the team’s games.
National Hockey League Enterprises

National Hockey League Enterprises (NHLE) managed the promotion of the game, the licensing of NHL merchandise, and the exploitation of corporate marketing partnerships. NHLE was a large enterprise with job descriptions ranging from “Asia/Pacific Promotions” to “Grassroots Development”. NHLE was housed in downtown New York, New York, U.S.A.

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National Hockey League Enterprises Canada

NHLE’s Canadian counterpart, the National Hockey League Enterprises Canada (NHLEC), was located in
Toronto, Ontario, Canada. NHLEC was a relatively small operation under the managerial control of the
New York office (an organizational chart is given in Exhibit 2).
One of NHLEC’s primary strategic goals was to develop a distinct brand image. The ever-increasing number of licensees and retailers for NHL-branded merchandise was becoming too fragmented. Wakefield wanted the brand’s image to be presented consistently to consumers at the retail level. He believed this approach would, in turn, translate into increased sales