Nazi Policies And Actions Against Homosexuals

1917 WordsMar 14, 20178 Pages
When we remember the Holocaust, the first thing that comes to mind is the genocide of the millions of Jews in Europe. Yet, we often forget about the other minorities also persecuted by Adolf Hitler and the Nazi party during their reign of terror. These minorities such as gypsies, criminals, anti-socials, Jehovah’s witnesses and homosexuals, continued to live fearfully and cautiously, often shamed into silence, after the war as they were still viewed with negative stigmas. In this research paper, I will be shedding light on the persecution of one group of these forgotten victims – the homosexuals. I will discuss the extent to which Nazi policies and actions against homosexuals compare to those against Jews and will be focusing on…show more content…
Therefore, just one month after Hitler took power in Germany, he banned all homosexual rights organizations. Then, in June 1935, Heinrich Himmler, a leading member of the Nazi party, Reichsführer of the Schutzstaffel and a known extremist, took no time to upgrade paragraph 175 to Nazi standards. The revised 1935 version states “a male who commits lewd and lascivious acts with another male or permits himself to be so abused for lewd and lascivious acts , shall be punished by imprisonment.[…] the loss of civil rights might also be imposed” Thus, not only criminalizing sexual relations between two males, but any form of physical contact between them as well. Henceforth, administrating an exhaustive array of the definition of a homosexual act. Seeing that homosexual acts had been broadened, this had allowed Nazis to arrest individuals under something as insignificant as speculations of a male sexual orientation. Minor acts of homosexuality are what lead to survivor Heinz Heger’s, arrest and was ordered to his neighborhood Gestapo headquarters. Upon his arrival, he was met with a photograph of himself along with his boyfriend at the time, on which “To my friend Fred, in eternal love and deepest affection”, was written on the back. Then, without the knowledge of his family, the Gestapo sent him to prison and then a concentration camp. Similarly, Pierre Seel’s name was added to the
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