Night By Elie Wiesel : Book Analysis

708 WordsNov 2, 20173 Pages
Luba Frederick, a holocaust survivor, answered “To die was easy.”, when discussing the tragic and horrible events of the holocaust. In the Nazi concentration camps, life was miserable. Jews were oppressed by Nazi’s and forced to do their dirty work. Families, jobs, dreams, were nothing more than an illusion as cruel and inhumane treatment replaced them. People felt hopeless and looked to death as an option. Many were intrigued with the idea of death, since it was easier to give up rather than choosing to continue. Majority of people stopped eating, gave up their religious faiths and hope, welcoming the darkness to embrace them. Surviving was a constant struggle for these people and the only way to overcome it was the acceptance of death.…show more content…
Why couldn’t he have avoided Idek’s wrath? That was what life in a concentration camp had made of me….”(Night, 54) , the concentration camps turned family against one another. People have been forced to adapt to their surroundings and their surroundings happen to made up of the same negative energy. Suppressed anger was directed to family members rather than the oppressors who imprisoned them. It was either survive or die trying and if people got in the way, disregard them as if they were another stranger in the street. Death would be easier than to watch yourself change for the worse. In the camps Germans used violence and death threats to keep the Jewish prisoners frightened and submissive. “The night was pitch-black. From time to time, a shot exploded in the darkness. They had orders to shoot anyone who could not sustain the pace. Their fingers on the triggers, and they did not deprive themselves of the pleasure. If one of us stopped for a second, quick shot eliminated the filthy dog.”(Night, 87), the officers didn’t see the Jews as nothing more than inferior. They were viewed to be less and treated like a smelly homeless dog. The prisoners themselves began to act similar to the Germans when they began to view violence as entertainment, a coping mechanism, and pleasure. The inhumane aggression and senseless, cruel violence they were given forced them to be just as inhumane towards their fellow prisoners.
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