Night, Hope, By Elie Wiesel

1580 WordsOct 13, 20177 Pages
Forty-two years after entering the concentration camp for the first time, Elie Wiesel remarked, “Just as man cannot live without dreams, he cannot live without hope” (Nobel Lecture 1). This means a lot from someone who endured almost two years of the terror in the WWII concentration camps. During these two years, Elie endured the sadness of leaving his former life and faith behind, the pain of living off of scraps of bread, and the trepidation of the “selections”, where he almost lost his father. He watched the hanging of innocent people, was beat by Kapos and guards time after time, and marched in a death march right after having a foot surgery. Through all of this, he survived because he remained hopeful. Hope was all the Jewish people…show more content…
Even as the war got closer, the Jewish people remained hopeful and they tried to see the good in things, as absurd as it sounds. For example, when they were forced into the ghettos, people looked on the bright side, and found good things about them. Elie, looking back on the ghettos experience stated, “People thought this was a good thing. We would no longer have to look at all those hostile faces, endure those hate-filled stares” (Wiesel 12). So, even after the hate of the Germans had reached Sighet, the people were still thinking positive. They never even ventured to think about how situations could turn negative. When things did get negative, and they learned that they would have to be transported, they started having more pessimistic thinking, but they still were counting on a miracle to pull through for them. When Elie asked his father when they were expected to depart, he replied, “‘The day after tomorrow. Unless…things work out. A miracle, perhaps…’” (Wiesel 18). This shows that Elie’s family still had hope as they were going to be transported. They were more worried than they had been before, but they still had hope for a miracle. Overall, at the beginning of the book the characters were very hopeful and optimistic, even though scary events were happening around them. Next, as the book progressed,
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