Nike Overseas Labor Practices

5343 Words Oct 12th, 2010 22 Pages
Date of Submission: 13 December 2009

Title of Assignment: Integrating Business Values: The Legality, Morality, and Social Responsibility of Nike’s Overseas Labor Practices and Misleading Statements to the Media.

CERTIFICATION OF AUTHORSHIP:I certify that I am the author of this paper and that any assistance I received in its preparation is fully acknowledged and disclosed in the paper. I have also cited any sources from which I used data, ideas or words, either quoted directly or paraphrased. I also certify that this paper was prepared by me specifically for this course.

Student 's Signature: Pete Saunders

*****************************************************************

Instructor 's Grade on Assignment:

Instructor 's
…show more content…
Today, Nike employs more than 33,000 people globally. The company’s World Headquarters is located in Beaverton, Oregon and is home to more than 7,000 employees. Additionally, Nike has almost 800,000 workers in their contract supply chain. Nike estimates that 80 percent of these workers are women aged 18 to 24, many of whom are the first women in their families to work in the formal economy. After years of good publicity and increasing profits, Nike was hit by claims it was involved in unfair overseas labor practices. These include child labor, extreme low wages, and employee abuse. Nike has contracted with more than 700 shops around the world and has offices located in 45 countries outside the United States. Most of Nike’s are located in Indonesia, China, Taiwan, India, Thailand, Vietnam, Pakistan, Philippines, and Malaysia. In the 1980s and 1990s, the corporation had been plagued by a series of labor incidents and public relations nightmares: underage workers in Indonesian plants, allegations of coerced overtime in China, dangerous working conditions in Vietnam. For a while, the stories had been largely confined to labor circles and activist publications. In 1997, Nike was faced with a terrible tragedy when a Vietnamese factory worker, Phuong, died as a result of
Open Document