Nonverbal Communication in the Works of Tubbs and Moss, and William Blake's Ideas of Perception and Biases

1323 Words5 Pages
Question 1 Nonverbal communication is just as important in verbal communication in most instances. In fact, a lot can be disseminated through nonverbal cues and behaviors. Tubbs and Moss show how influential nonverbal communication can be within their work Human Communication: Principles and Contexts, which shows that even the most hidden elements of nonverbal cues can influence communication, both positively and negatively. One of the last sections of Chapter 4: The Nonverbal Message in Tubbs and Moss' work discusses the concept of deception and how it can be inferred through nonverbal cues and behaviors on the behalf of the communicator who is lying. One of the most obvious signs of lies is the addition of unnecessary details and the increased justification of the speaker's point as a way to truly convince the listener; yet, there are plenty of nonverbal cues as well. In fact, there a number of behaviors which can be associated with the act of deception, which if inferred by the listener can help detect lies. Often the lack of normal gestures and body movements can be a signal that the party is in the act of trying to deceive the listener. Stiff movements, or lack thereof, shows that the individual is thinking too hard on what he or she may be saying, trying to convince the listener that they are telling the truth. Additionally, when the speaker avoids eye contact or makes the act of looking into his or her eyes awkward, there may be elements of deceit taking place.

    More about Nonverbal Communication in the Works of Tubbs and Moss, and William Blake's Ideas of Perception and Biases

      Open Document