Not Just A Game : The Impact Of Sports On U.s. Economy

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It is undeniable that in today 's society, the sports industry is booming and has become more and more successful within the past sixty years. With the average professional athletes ' income soaring to higher levels, most visibly in sports such as football, basketball, and baseball, it is easy to see that American citizens are more than obsessed with sports. Basis for this paper is based off of one particular online article titled, “Not Just a Game: The Impact of Sports on U.S. Economy”. A brief summary of this particular article will follow this introduction. Although I do agree with the main premiss of this article, there are a few points which do need to be questioned. With this continuously growing obsession of the sports…show more content…
This article starts out by stating that the sports industry generates roughly $14.3 billion in earnings a year EXCLUDING the huge amount of indirect earning accumulated on Super Bowl Sunday which has the second most amount of food consumed in one day (behind Thanksgiving) and provides 456,000 jobs with the average salary being $39,000. Next, it is examined how the sports industry has so much power in the United State 's economy today. Fifteen industries with at least 10,000 jobs were analyzed since there is not a designated sports sector, and six main sports jobs (only spectator sports not hunting, fishing etc.). A table is then presented showing how many people are employed in each of the 15 industries, the percent of occupation in each job group, and the percentage of total jobs in each. Effect on earnings is then briefly discussed and shown on a pie chart showing that initial, or the sports workers ' salaries accounts for $10.3 billion, direct which is the purchase of supplies needed such as uniforms and shoes and accounts for $2.6 billion, then indirect which supplies the direct supply chain which accounts for $1.4 billion. Last, occupation growth and Industry patters are talked about using nearly nothing but different graphs and charts. It is also stated that
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