Nuclear Waste Essay

949 Words Sep 16th, 2012 4 Pages
Nuclear Waste by Richard A. Muller
Nuclear waste is a radioactive waste that is dangerous, and a fair percentage of people would agree on this topic. However, is it really dangerous or is it just harmful to an extent? In society, many debates are held over trying to prove to the world that this substance is harmful. In the essay, “Nuclear Waste,” Muller states clearly that he sides with the anti-nuke of the debate and how he pinpoints the facts of nuclear waste with great persuasion. Yet, it is uncertain whether Muller clearly has a good argument and/or answers the questions that many people linger to know.
In Richard A. Muller’s article “Nuclear Waste,” the author states clearly about how he is against the issues on nuclear waste and
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However, near the end of the essay, it seems that Muller changes his position and points out that the possibility of “if all the nuclear waste was to be leaked and managed to get in lakes and rivers, and oceans; the risks imposed would be 20 times less than other wastes such as uranium that could impose a threat.” (Muller 212) From what I believe, I think that the author knows that his position does not exactly put out a good argument. By Muller addressing that nuclear waste leakage is 20 times less than uranium leakage, he is saying that nuclear waste is safe. This may cause people to be confused by the fact that Muller states that is anti-nuke about nuclear waste.
Throughout the essay, I felt that Muller’s argument in his essay was weak after his my confession paragraph. It was a bit odd because Muller doesn’t seem like he holds his case as strongly as before. He seemed like he was strongly against nuclear waste but he doesn’t state how we should address this problem. I think it was interesting that the author did not have a very clear position at all. It is clear that he dislikes nuclear waste, especially when he presents his case and pinpoints the facts with great persuasion. However, he didn’t really mention what he feels that we should do about the case. Muller doesn’t address all of society’s unanswered questions such as how society should go about doing with nuclear waste. He only tells the readers what he thinks of politicians and scientists’ point of