Obedience Essay

744 Words3 Pages
Obedience In this essay I am going to write on how obedience can affect individuals on how they would normally behave and integrate in society. The meaning of Obedience is a form of social influence where an individual acts in response to a direct order from another individual, who is usually an authority figure. It is assumed that without such an order the person would not have acted in this way. (McLeod, 2007) Migram (1963) conducted a study on how obedient a person would be to an authority figure and establish a baseline measure of how obedient they would be when ordered to inflict pain to another human via electric shocks. The way he conducted this was by doing a lab experiment, he advertised for forty volunteers being paid £2 to…show more content…
The rest going all the way a staggering 65% we believe the pressure of the authoritative figure in the room telling them to continue and telling them they will not be held responsible for anything bad that happens in the test. Social setting is a powerful determinate of behavior, we are socialized to recognize authority and react to obedience. There are many positives to Milgrams study such as in has applicability; this experiment has shown us that we are very obedient to authoritative figures. C.P. Snow (1961) noted that ‘when you think of the long and gloomy history of man, you will find more hideous crimes have been committed in the name of obedience than have ever been committed in the name of rebellion. One such example of this was when six million innocent people were systematically slaughtered on command by the Nazis during Hitler’s regime. One of the criticisms of Milgram’s work is concerned with its ethics was participants were deceived as to the exact nature of the study for which they had volunteered, and by making them believe they were administering real electric shocks to a real participant. However Milgram could not have found results that truly reflected the way people behave in real situations if he had not deceived his participants, all of whom were thoroughly debriefed afterwards. A major criticism of Milgram’s study was his unrepresentative sample. Milgram chose to study only American men (thus he was deliberately ethnocentric), but
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