Oedipus The King : A Tragic Hero

870 Words Sep 17th, 2014 4 Pages
Modern day drama has roots in the beautifully structured Greek theatrical culture. In the sixth century, ancient Greece, and more specifically Athens, overflowed with artistic talent. The Dionysian Festival materialized from Athens and this is where we first saw comedies and tragedies on stage. The Greek, as with many other cultures, honored their gods and did much to please and placate them. The Dioynsia Festival, which honored their god Dionysus, is proof of this. Sophocles, the well-known playwright, emerged and thrived in the fifth century. He frequently competed in the festival, with some of the oldest tragedies and his most famous being performed there. While only seven of his plays have survived, many, like Oedipus the King, are still prevalent today. It definitely meets the five main criteria for a tragedy: a tragic hero of noble birth, a tragic flaw, a fall from grace, a moment of remorse, and catharsis.
Oedipus the King is seen as a perfect tragedy. It features a hero with a tragic flaw, Oedipus, and highlights many common themes in Greek tragedy such as fate or destiny, love, pride, loss, the abuse of power, and a tense relationship between man and God. It also meets the five main standards for a tragedy: a tragic hero of noble birth, a tragic flaw, a fall from grace, a moment of remorse, and catharsis [HubPages]. In this play, the audience learns of Oedipus’ past and hears foreshadowing of his future all while we see him trying to figure it out for himself. He…
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