Of Elie Wiesel's 'Crumbling Is Not An InstantAct'

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Recently, in Las Vegas, Nevada, a terrorist attack injured or killed hundreds of civilians who were dancing and singing at a concert. This event shook the nation. Numerous terrorist attacks like this occur consistently in the 21st century, and many people feel powerless against these shooters. With all of these mass shootings, many people question their faiths in humanity and God. Similar to many people in the 21st century, Elie Wiesel, the other inmates, and survivors of the Holocaust feel conflicted about their faiths in humanity and God. Wiesel describes his experience of losing his faith in his book Night, and American poet Emily Dickenson captures this feeling of powerlessness and confliction and shares it with the reader in her poem, "Crumbling is Not an Instant's Act". In Night and "Crumbling is Not an Instants Act", Elie Wiesel and Emily Dickenson use pathos to convey the prisoner's collapsing convictions through the slow, deterioration of a strong faith in humanity, an unchallenged belief in God, and his convictive faith in himself and his ability to withstand dehumanization. For example, Dickenson and Wiesel use pathos to convey the prisoner's collapsing convictions through the slow, deterioration of the prisoner's strong faith in humanity. Crumbling is a process, the dilapidation is organized and does not happen all at once, "Crumbling is not an instant's Act\A fundamental pause\Dilapidation's processes\Are organized Decays" (Dickenson 1-4). Dickenson captures the

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