On July 7th 2011, Verisign issued a statement declaring that all .com, .net, .org and many other

700 WordsApr 23, 20193 Pages
On July 7th 2011, Verisign issued a statement declaring that all .com, .net, .org and many other domain names would become under United States (US) jurisdiction. Websites containing these domain names, which were registered outside of US, have encountered various implications for multiple reasons. Firstly, although these websites are registered in a country other than the US, they are subjected to US law despite the fact that the registrar might be living in a country with differentiating laws. The Bodog.com case is a clear example of this. Secondly, the US now has authority to actually seize a website and hold the website’s registrar accountable if their website is deemed to be illegal under US laws. Lastly, this is a clear case of the US…show more content…
It is clear that the online gaming industry is legal under international law and in the case of these documents it is also clear that the rule of law was not allowed to slow down a rush to try to win the war of public opinion.” This quotation explains the US internet jurisdiction precisely. Bodog.com did not accept any US bettors and had restricted access to US citizens and the US has no connections with this website. Online gaming is legal in many international countries and this clearly shows the unnecessary abuse of power by the US. If this case had been judged prior to this change in approach, Ayre would have been found not guilty and Bodog.com would still be up and running. Moreover, not only can the US seize a website, but it can also make the registrar of the website stand trial in the US, if the authorities of the registrar’s country decide not to act. This occurred with Richard O’Dwyer, a twenty-three year old United Kingdom (UK) resident, created tvshack.net, a website which hosted links to pirated material, but did not host the material itself (U.S. Claims Global Jurisdiction of .net and .com Web Sites: Is .edu Next?). This did not breach European internet copyright laws and O’Dwyer was never prosecuted for copyright infringement by UK authorities, until the US claimed jurisdiction over certain domain names including .com and .net. The fact of the matter is that website registrars who

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