On the Train by Gillian Clarke, Patrolling Barnegat by Walt Whitman, and the Storm on the Island by Seamus Heane

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I’m going to compare the use of the poetic devices to portray fear and confusion in 3 different types of poems, they are; On the Train by Gillian Clarke, Patrolling Barnegat by Walt Whitman, and the poem Storm on the Island by the one and only Seamus Heaney. These poems all portray the feeling of confusion, often it is linked within a theme of some war. Walt Whitman uses some repetition to enhance the power of the storm he is trying to describe. "Wild, Wild the storm, and the sea high running"
The repetition of the word wild in this line helps to enforce the power of the deadly storm and nature. Whitman also uses personification in the line where he compares the movement of the sea to someone running, as if he is saying the sea will move
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I’m going to compare the use of the poetic devices to portray fear and confusion in 3 different types of poems, they are; On the Train by Gillian Clarke, Patrolling Barnegat by Walt Whitman, and the poem Storm on the Island by the one and only Seamus Heaney. These poems all portray the feeling of confusion, often it is linked within a theme of some war. Walt Whitman uses some repetition to enhance the power of the storm he is trying to describe. "Wild, Wild the storm, and the sea high running"
The repetition of the word wild in this line helps to enforce the power of the deadly storm and nature. Whitman also uses personification in the line where he compares the movement of the sea to someone running, as if he is saying the sea will move for no one. He is also making it sound if the sea were to be rushing to get somewhere as if it is on some mission. Whitman also incorporates some rhyme in his poem. This gives his poem a very strong rhythm and this rhythm goes in with the image of the sea, and gives this image more effect.
In Storm on the Island Seamus Heaney describes a vivid, powerful storm. He describes the storm as if he had learned from past experience. He describes how he was preparing for the storm as if he had gone through it many times before.
"Can raise a tragic chorus in a gale" Here Seamus Heaney is comparing the terrible storm to a tragic chorus, which could be associated with some type of opera - a form of entertainment. Seamus Heaney is using 2 opposites to

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