Essay on Oregon's Election

624 Words Jun 24th, 2012 3 Pages
Pg. 188, #2

Douglas J. Futuyma on the limits of science: [[S]cience seeks to explain only objective knowledge], [knowledge that can be acquired independently by different investigators if they follow a prescribed course of observation or experiment]. [Many human experiences and concerns are not objective] and (so) [do not fall within the realm of science]. (As a result), **[science has nothing to say about aesthetics or morality]**….[The functioning of human society, then, clearly requires principles that stem from some source other than science.]

1. Science seeks to explain only objective knowledge

2. knowledge that can be acquired independently by different investigators if they follow a prescribed course of observation or
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[They don’t need to spend time after school]. [Teacher, it is time to wake up].

Exercise 7.4 #9

From a newspaper editorial: The recent use of mail ballots in Oregon’s election of a U.S. senator has led some people to hail this (as) the wave of the future in our democratic republic. We do not share that enthusiasm. The primary advantage of the mail ballot is that it requires little time and effort on the part of the voter. We think that also is a primary shortcoming of this process. It is worth a little of both our time and our energy to exercise the right to vote, and that personal investment should serve to make us a bit more conscious of the value of that opportunity. Another negative aspect for the electorate is that a mail election necessarily must take place over a relatively long time frame, rather than a single day that is the culmination of an election campaign process. That means voters who cast their ballots near the end of the designated voting period might have a larger volume of information, and perhaps more accurate information, than those who vote early in the process. We also seriously concerned about the potential for voter fraud in elections conducted by mail. A state with Louisiana’s political history would be fertile ground for that. Finally, we take note of one of the more ironic potential shortcomings of this procedure, and that is the very fact that this process
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