Orwell's Comparing Animal Farm and The Russian System Of Communism

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Orwell's Comparing Animal Farm and The Russian System Of Communism

Animal Farm is a satire and prophecy of the Russian revolution, which was written by George Orwell in 1945. George Orwell was a political satirist who led a somewhat strange life. His original name was 'Eric Arthur Blair', which was later changed to his familiar pen name for its 'manly, English, country-sounding ring'. He was a lonely boy and had many uncertain jobs until he finally became a writer, crossing political and artistic ideas into most of his books. The novel Animal Farm is George Orwell's way of portraying his ideas, criticisms and negative opinions on the Russian revolution, and therefore is negatively biased against
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The novel has many direct relationships to the Russian revolution, and many of the characters in the story represent actual people involved in the Russian revolution, whereas some characters represent a social group just by themselves. This is done to keep the allegory of the farm realistic; if there were millions of horses because they represented the working class, the novel would become very unrealistic. An example: Napoleon the pig represents Stalin, whereas Boxer the horse represents the exploited working class who were the backbone of the communist revolution. He works exceedingly hard, believing it is for the good of all his comrades, when it is only the pigs that are really benefiting. The ultimate betrayal of the working class is represented when Boxer is given to the glue factory when it is found he can no longer maintain his hard work.

There are also characters in the book that show how the ideologies of communism are doomed to fail. These are characters such as Mollie the horse, who is very lazy, and takes advantage of the supposed "All animals are equal" policy. She does very little work, and is not punished in any way, nor has any negative consequences. This character represents one of Orwell's predictions of the failure of the actual Soviet revolution, and shows quite