Othello, The Moor Of Venice

960 WordsOct 26, 20154 Pages
Evil Skills There are many reasons to hate the antagonist in the play Othello, The Moor of Venice. He is a master manipulator, vindictive, evil person just to name a few. “Iago belongs to a select group of villains in Shakespeare who, while plausibly motivated in human terms, also take delight in evil for its own sake” (Bevington, 2014); for this reason he is often considered to have demonic traits. Was Shakespeare showing his own personal demons with the creation of the character Iago? Alternatively, does Iago’s character represent the evils that exist in the world? He seeks to punish not only Othello for passing him over for a promotion and giving it to Cassio, but to seek his vengeance on Cassio as well and anyone else that stands in his way. Iago plays a key role in the play Othello, acting as the devil’s advocate for poor Othello bringing about the death of more than Desdemona. Iago will go to great lengths to accomplish the result he desires. With the use of Iago’s master manipulation skills he is able to orchestrate a intricate senerio that leads to the demise of Othello and those around him. In Act 1 Scene 3, the audience sees the first preview of the kind of man Iago is. “In double knavery—How, how? Let’s see: After some time, to abuse Othello’s ear That he is too familiar with his wife. He hath a person and a smooth dispose To be suspected, framed to make women false. The Moor is of a free and open nature, That thinks men honest that but seem to be so, And will as
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