Overview of Assisted Living Facilities

3342 Words Jul 22nd, 2013 14 Pages
Abstract
Assisted living is a fairly new and unique part of the long term care continuum of services. The goal of assisted living is to maximize the independence of older adults while living in a homelike environment. This paper will provide an overview of assisted living facilities including the number of facilities and residents, costs, services, and growth expectations. Challenges with oversight and regulations will be discussed as well as solutions to the problem. Challenges and solutions for staffing and training issues will also be discussed. The paper will also highlight “In Loving Hands Assisted Living” which is a local assisted living facility that I called and visited to aid in my research. I will give an overview of the
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(Code of Maryland regulations)

According to the National Center for Assisted Living, (2001) assisted living facilities are typically “stand-alone” facilities, but can often be a part of another facility within the long term continuum of care such as a nursing home, senior housing complex, retirement community, or independent living apartments. Assisted living facilities are different in appearance than nursing homes and other facilities in that they tend to offer a more home-like environment. These residences may be condominiums, a residential house, or apartments with personalized decorations and room layouts. They typically offer common areas for dining and activities. Approximately half of ALF’s are non-profit, with the other half being for-profit facilities. Very few assisted living facilities are government run. Because licensing regulations vary from state to state, ALF’s can be known by various names including residential care, board and care, domiciliary care, personal care etc. Assisted living facilities offer different levels of care depending on the amount of assistance the resident requires. Most of these providers are licensed at level three, which means they can accept patients with low, moderate, or high care needs (University of Maryland,