Pablo Neruda

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Verb I’m going to wrinkle this word, I’m going to twist it, yes, it is much too flat it is as if a great dog or great river had passed its tongue or water over it during many years. I want that in the word the roughness is seen the iron salt The de-fanged strength of the land, the blood of those who have spoken and those who have not spoken. I want to see the thirst Inside the syllables I want to touch the fire in the sound: I want to feel the darkness of the cry. I want words as rough as virgin rocks. Verb I’m going to wrinkle this word, I’m going to twist it, yes, it is much too flat it is as if a great dog or great river had passed its tongue or water over it during many years. I want…show more content…
On the other hand, the journalist could have written, “An officer killed a man in the line of duty. The black man was instigating a group against the officer putting his physical well being at risk.” In both cases, the journalist accomplished his objective of informing the readers. However, the context and the form have been changed dramatically influencing the audience in a very different way. In the poem “Verb,” the author’s pleading is to not disguise the reality, for horrific it could be, but with pretty, condescending, and soft words. Consider the following stanza: It’s too smooth, As if the tongue Of a big dog or a big river’s water Had washed it For years and years. Have you ever seen how a dog’s tongue smoothes out a bone? Once the bone loses shape and hardness, the dog loses interest in the bone. Have you ever seen a stone in the river? Through years the stone becomes flat, soft, even beautiful in its smoothness, but at the same time it loses its roughness, which is one of the main characteristics of the stone. This is what Neruda is suggesting about language. Neruda uses figurative language to denounce the fault of smoothing out words and by doing this he delivers a message that without strength, roughness, and intensity words aren’t as powerful or truthful. For this reason, the poem finishes as, “I want rough words / like virginal stones” (22-23). This means words, like stones before

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