Parliamentary and Presidential Form of Government

8135 Words Oct 1st, 2012 33 Pages
INTRODUCTION

Presidential and Parliamentary systems are the two possible forms of Government in a democracy. In England there is the Parliamentary system, and it has worked so well over the years that it has become a model for a number of other countries. In the U.S.A., on the other hand, there is the Presidential form of executive, and it has been working quite successfully in that country. These two forms of government have their own distinctive characteristics, and their own respective merits and demerits. A parliamentary system is a system of government in which the ministers of the executive branch get their democratic legitimacy from the legislature and are accountable to that body, such that the executive and legislative branches
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The US , constitution vests executive powers in the hands of one individual , that is the President of United States Of America. His powers are so enormous, wide and overwhelming that he has been described as the, "foremost ruler of the world". The American President is not bound down by any cabinet. He chooses his own cabinet, which is at best his personal team of advisers. " the president exercise largest amount of authority ever and as wielded by any man in democracy". This system is called PRESIDENTIAL SYSYEM OF GOVERNMENT.
American President in respect of his powers is best compared to the Prime minister of the parliamentary democracies enjoying the support of a stable majority in the legislature; he is rather head of the state and the responsible head of the government. In many other nations, there is a chief of state whose duties are largely protocol in nature while the Prime Minister is the center of power. But the American President is the nation's principal spokesman of both domestic and foreign policy.

History of presidential system of government

The presidential system has its origins in the monarchies of medieval Europe. Like a king, the president retains executive authority over the state and government. The system took its modern form following the publication of "The Spirit of the Laws" in 1748 by French philosopher