Pathophysiology Essay

937 Words Oct 18th, 2013 4 Pages
1. A 21 year-old college student notices that she frequently develops “cold sores” during stressful final exam week. 1. What is the association between stress and the immune system?
The human body has a built in stress response system that usually self regulates. When a threat is perceived the body deploys white blood cells to the area of the body that is under attack (Segerstrom & Miller, 2006). Because of this, less important cellular activities are reduced and the immune system is left vulnerable. When the body perceives a threat there are three phases it goes through. (Story, 2012). The first is the alarm stage, in which the sympathetic nervous system is stimulated and in response deploys the release of
…show more content…
The student has a Type I (IgE mediated) hypersensitivty reaction to latex. This response is caused by repeated exposure to the allergen (Story, 2012).With repeated exposure, the antigen binds with the surface IgE and mediators are released (Story, 2012). TH2 cells are involved with hypersensitivity reactions (Anand, 2012).

References:
Anand, Miriam K. (2012). Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions. Retrieved from http://emedicine.medscape.com/article
Story, Lachel. (2012). Pathophysiology: A Practical Approach. Massachusetts: Jones and Bartlett Learning, LLC.

3. A 36 year-old man presents with fever, night sweats, weight loss, and a feeling of fullness in his abdomen. Subsequent lymph node biopsy reveals a diagnosis of non-Hodgkins Lymphoma (NHL). 3. Although lymphomas can originate in any of the lymphoid tissues of the body, most originate in the lymph nodes, and most (80% to 85%) are of B-Cell origin. Hypothesize as to why B-cells are more commonly affected than T-cells.
Although research opinions vary on the cause of lymphomas, it is known that T-cell lymphomas are very rare. Lymphomas are thought to be caused by the damaged genes that control the development of the body’s blood cells ( B and T Cell Lymphomas, n.d.) The B- cells and T-cells play different roles in the body. T-cells can be helper cells, suppressor cells or killer cells (Story, 2012). It is the