Perception of Death Essay

1340 Words Nov 10th, 2014 6 Pages
Perception of Death and The Treatment of Death in “Everyman” Liberty University

Everyman
Thesis: “Everyman” is a play that gives a message that death is inevitable. It shows that there is nothing a person can do to avoid it regardless of their worldly riches.

I. Introduction A. Title of Poem – “Everyman” B. Author - Unknown C. Summary of Plot II. Analysis of the Play A. Characters B. Setting C. Theme III. The Author’s View of Death A. The author describes death by using allegory to camouflage the idea of death. B. The certainty of death C. Every man’s soul needs to be saved before death. IV. Biblical View of Death A. Romans 8:28 (New
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Another friend of Everyman is Good Deeds who wanted to go with him to the afterlife and Knowledge told Everyman what he needed to do have salvation. Confession represented repentance and he was one who Everyman confessed his sins. Finally, the Angel welcomed Everyman to Heaven and the Doctor gave him the notice about death (Cummings, 2010). The setting of the play takes place in Heaven and on earth. In the play “Everyman,” (as cited in Literature and Spirituality, 2011, pp. 265-267), “God sends Death to summon Everyman to give account of their lives on earth.” At the end of the play, it takes place back in Heaven. Several themes appear in the play. First, live a godly life today as if it were the last day of your life. This should include offering love and help to others. In the play “Everyman,” (as cited in Literature and Spirituality, 2011, pp. 265-267), “Man, in the beginning, / Look well, and take good heed to the ending.” Everyman repented his sins before it was too late. He made known his sins absolving him of the guilt and therefore earning him the joy of repentance. Second, a younger person views sin as something sweet smelling, like the smell of perfume, only to realize that sin is an immoral act against God’s law and there are consequences. In the play “Everyman,” (as cited in Literature and Spirituality, 2011, pp. 265-267), “Ye think sin in the beginning full sweet, / Which in the end causeth thy soul to weep, / When