Permanent Impact of the Counter-Culture on Today's American Society

1953 Words Nov 18th, 2005 8 Pages
"What is not illusionary is the reality of a new culture of opposition. It grows out of the disintegration of the old forms, vinyl and aerosol institutions that carry all the inane and destructive values of privatism; competition, commercialism, profitability and elitism…It's not a "youth thing" by now but a generational event; chronological age is the only current phase". The previous quote was written by Andrew Kopkind in Rolling Stone on the Woodstock festival observing that a new culture was immersing from the roots of the adult American life (1960's 198). Words such as "counter-culture", "establishment", "non-violence", "free-love" and "Woodstock" were not even in the American vocabulary until the war against North Vietnam started in …show more content…
Another way that changed or become popular with the exposure of a counter culture in the sixties and had shaped the American society was the growth of the rock music, increase of drug, alcohol abuse and freedom about sex. Hippies were basically blithe about a lot of things that they did not like. These were signs to get noticed about how they wished to get away from the American culture. One of their slogans was, "Get every creature so stoned they can't stand the plastic shit of American culture" (1960's 200). A history professor, Terry H. Anderson wrote, "Hippies commonly took drugs to expand their consciousness, to rebel against the establishment and to enhance their own sense of being different" (200). They were mainly dissenters who liked experimenting. New drugs came out continuously but the most popular ones were LSD, marijuana, certain hallucinogens, heroin and alcohol. Surveys from the sixties show that in early sixties only 4 percent of people from ages 18 to 25 had tried marijuana and twelve years after, it was 50 percent in the nation as a whole and 60 percent for college students and even higher in some universities. (201). 1960's became a drug culture during that era. The rise in drugs and alcohol usage during the sixties is a cause of the considerable drug and alcohol abuse in the United States. Today in the U.S. there are approximately 11.5
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