Perseverance In The Military

1373 Words6 Pages
Taking on Perseverance As I trudged bleakly through the double doors, slowly sitting down in my seat, and listened as the cushion deflated underneath me, I wondered whether I could just go back to my dorm and sleep. Thoughts ran through my light-headed brain, all I could really think about had to do with tissues, and lots of water to mask my hideous cough. I hated being sick, especially during school. Nevertheless, I still went to every one of my classes, even if I felt horrible. I always told myself during times when I felt like giving up, just one more hour, just one more day. Just like me, thousands of people went through similar situations, but the way they respond to them showed their own personal perspectives. Each person created their…show more content…
Through his years serving in the Navy, and his now current job as a civilian contractor for the Navy, my dad worked on many vital projects that help maintain our Naval forces. Even with this pressure, my dad learned to persevere and complete the tasks given to him, not just for himself, but for everyone counting on him. Through his experience, my dad taught my brother and I how to persevere, and shaped my own personal connotation of the word. In a similar fashion, Marsha Colbey’s story gave another goal-orientated definition of perseverance. Marsha Colbey, a falsely-accused mother put in prison, persevered through the horrible experiences of women being raped by prison guards, beatings, and the constant fear of death in prison to right the wrongs done to her and the other women in similar situations as her, as well as to see her beloved family again. No matter what Mrs. Colbey saw, she looked forward, because of her love for her family, and those around her. Each person held a unique perspective of perseverance because each person faces different challenges and opportunities; these experiences helped them overcome obstacles, and allowed them to find different ways to help…show more content…
Instead of forgetting and moving forward, sometimes people needed to continue to help others in similar, or even worse situations; “’It’s what bother me the most now, knowing that they are still there and I’m home. I hope we can do more to help more people’” (Stevenson 241). Marsha Colbey understood the struggles of the women she knew from prison, and instead of putting that trauma away, she used it to help others like her, and helped those that gave her the hope to persevere through those years. Role models built the foundation that people who share experiences can follow and look up to. My father, Michael Kim cited his own commanding officer as a the one who taught him “what it means to serve God and country” (Kim). As a teenager myself, having a role model like my father, someone who went through the same situations and troubles as me helped me when I went through difficult times in my life. Whether someone worked as a teacher, officer, or just happened to be a stranger passing by, everyone can help each other persevere through our lives. Without the presence of another person, people who felt lost, feel that their life could end with just a few
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