Personal Health Records Advantages And Disadvantages

822 Words4 Pages
At first blush it would seem that maintaining a personal health record (PHR) has many merits. Almost everyone would want to have health information about them readily available in a digital format and completely under their control. They could then make it accessible to anyone else they choose; for example, emergency health personnel or a new specialist physician. Yet only a very small minority of Americans have a PHR, which should not to be confused with electronic health records (EHRs) maintained and controlled by doctors and hospitals. A number of explanations are offered for this surprising finding, but the most compelling one comes from Sigmund Freud. In public policy as in personal psychology, unconscious or subterranean forces exert…show more content…
Given that people are treated by a variety of specialists in addition to their primary care doctor, often travel, and move with relative frequency, a PHR enables new health care workers to gain a much fuller and more reliable record of an individual’s health and medical history than they gain when they have to rely on the patient’s memory or wait for records to be collected from previous sources of care. Health care also benefits from not having to repeatedly prepare a health and medical history. This history can be prepared once and incorporated into the PHR. From then on, it can be made available to any subsequent health care professional the individual…show more content…
(Note that the survey deals with EHRs and not necessarily PHRs.) Furthermore, over 60% of the public would use at least one feature of an online medical record if available, according to a 2003 Markle Foundation survey. The same survey found that 71% believed that access to online medical records would help clarify their doctors’ instructions, 65% felt that online records would “give then a greater sense of empowerment regarding their health,” and 65% felt that online records would help prevent
Get Access