Personal Skills Development in the Accounting Curriculum

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This article was downloaded by: [Sun Yat-Sen University] On: 02 June 2013, At: 05:15 Publisher: Routledge Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

Accounting Education: An International Journal
Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/raed20

Personal skills development in the accounting curriculum
Bob Gammie , Elizabeth Gammie & Erica Cargill Published online: 05 Oct 2010.

To cite this article: Bob Gammie , Elizabeth Gammie & Erica Cargill (2002): Personal skills development in the accounting curriculum, Accounting Education: An International
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The Department for Education and Employment (DfEE) (1997) has identi ed that employers frequently emphasize the importance of key
* Address for correspondence: Bob Gammie, Aberdeen Business School, The Robert Gordon University, Garthdee Road, Aberdeen, AB10 7QE, UK. E-mail: r.gammie@rgu.ac.u k Accounting Education ISSN 0963–9284 print/ISSN 1468–4489 online © 2002 Taylor & Francis Ltd http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals DOI: 10.1080/0963928021015327 2

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skills in preparing people to be part of a exible and adaptable workforce. They further emphasize the part they have to play in the employability of individuals throughout their working lives. It is evident that the nature of accounting has changed considerably, largely because the organizational, economic and technological context in which this type of work is conducted has changed, in many cases, beyond recognition (Cooper, 1998; Adamson et al., 1998). This is set to continue, and will manifest itself in many ways, perhaps most obviously through intensi cation of work practices. This has already radically changed the skills that accountants need in order to be effective in the
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