Peter Kurten: The Dusseldorf Vampire

1786 Words Jul 14th, 2018 8 Pages
Peter Kürten was known as Germany’s serial killer the “Düsseldorf Vampire,” a murder who killed at least nine people before surrendering to police in 1931. Kürten was born in Cologne, Germany on May 26, 1883 to a childhood of poverty and misconduct. Being first born out of thirteen children he was a witness to accounts of brutal acts and sadistic tendencies from an alcoholic father. For the majority of Kürten’s childhood, his father projected his misconduct onto both the mother and his siblings in the one room apartment they shared. From the subjection to sexual violence of his father had an influence on Kürten who, at the age of nine years old, established an unhealthy relationship with a dog-catcher who live in the same building. …show more content…
Being a political activist allowed for his abnormal behavior to diminish for the following four years. However this normality was short lived, by 1925 Kürten found himself drawn back into Düsseldorf too soon commit horrid crimes that German has seen. His criminal tendencies escalated from petty crimes to arson, and then to sexual attacks on children, women and even men, over a 15 month period. As quoted in his trial, “Kürten saw Düsseldorf again in the evening light and rejoiced that "the sunset was blood-red on my return," interpreting this as an omen of his destiny.” The year of 1929 was known as Peter Kürten’s year of terror on the people of Düsseldorf. One of Kürten’s first victims, Frau Kühn, suffered 24 wounds after being overtook before running off. His crime escalated six days later in the killing of 8 year old Rosa Ohliger, on February 9th, 1929. The Düsseldorf police were called once the body of the child was found under a hedge from Kürten’s attack. Her body was stabbed thirteen times with an attempt of burning the body to hide the evidence. Further evidence of the body indicated violent stabbings to the child in her gential as well as seminal stains from the murderer. The sadistic behavior was yet to be satisfied and found that returning to the scenes of his crimes allowed for a new sexual stimulant. As stated in trial, "The place where I attacked Frau Kühn I visited again that same evening

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