Physical Appearance Says What Words Cannot: Comparing Gandhi and Malcolm X

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Throughout their lives, both Malcolm X and Gandhi had similar and contrasting physical traits. In many ways, how they appeared on the outside shaped the people they were on the inside. Clothing became a device of nonverbal communication. Whether they recognized that themselves or not, that’s how it was. Had they not been colored, they would not have had advocated for justice. Though their personal philosophies drove them in different ways to resolve oppression; one with violence and the other with peace they were motivated just as much. Nonverbal communication helped both men gain support to raise awareness and achieve justice they sought for their ethnic and religious groups.
In Gandhi’s movement to free India, he chose to boycott
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Throughout their lives, both Malcolm X and Gandhi had similar and contrasting physical traits. In many ways, how they appeared on the outside shaped the people they were on the inside. Clothing became a device of nonverbal communication. Whether they recognized that themselves or not, that’s how it was. Had they not been colored, they would not have had advocated for justice. Though their personal philosophies drove them in different ways to resolve oppression; one with violence and the other with peace they were motivated just as much. Nonverbal communication helped both men gain support to raise awareness and achieve justice they sought for their ethnic and religious groups.
In Gandhi’s movement to free India, he chose to boycott all English cloth and clothing. Instead, he encouraged his followers to spin their own fabric to show up the Brits who were trying to keep control. Even while in prison, he continued to make his own clothes, telling Mirabehn it was “not an accomplishment for me” (Gandhi). Whereas Malcolm X, bought his clothing wherever he could find the specific look he was going for. “A salesman, a young Jew” (Malcolm X 54). While Malcolm X tries to gain justice for the black people, he does not try to extricate himself from the ‘white man’s business’. Later on in The Autobiography of Malcolm X, he does realize the he was becoming “”pretty” by white standards” (57). Though he does not recognize that he was putting money into the white’s pockets the

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