Poetry by William King, Martyn Lowery, Andrew Marvell, Liz Lochhead, John Cooper Clarke and Elizabeth Jennings

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Poetry by William King, Martyn Lowery, Andrew Marvell, Liz Lochhead, John Cooper Clarke and Elizabeth Jennings

Introduction.

The hearts and partners theme contains the following poems:

'The Beggar Woman' by William King (Pre 1900) 'Our Love Now' by Martyn Lowery 'To His Coy Mistress' by Andrew Marvell (Pre 1900) 'Rapunzstiltskin' by Liz Lochhead 'i wanna be yours' by John Cooper Clarke 'One Flesh' by Elizabeth Jennings

As the title suggests, hearts and partners deals with love and relationships. In your exam you will be expected to make comparisons between the different poems and this lesson will help you to make the connections you need to do this.

Poetic techniques

The
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'To His Coy Mistress' is a passionate plea by a young man to his 'mistress' to go to bed with him. He uses flattery ('an hundred years should go to praise / thine eyes'), fear ('thy beauty shall no more be found') and enthusiasm ('Let us roll all our strength, and all / Our sweetness, up into one ball') to persuade her to give up her virginity. He is only concerned with moving his relationship on to the sexual stage and, apart from the pleasure this will bring, he has no thought of its consequences.

The woman in 'The Beggar Woman' at first seems anything but reluctant to have sex with the gentleman she meets, but in fact she has a different agenda. She has a baby strapped to her back and by exploiting the gentleman's lust ('I should be loth / to come so far and disoblige you both') she is able to transfer it to him. She then leaves him with the child as a lesson in the consequences of casual sex.

I trust the child to you with all my heart But, ere you get another, 'ten't amiss To try a year or two how you'll keep this.

'One Flesh' is a meditation by a child on her parents who are now too old for sex. They sleep in the same room but in separate beds and 'chastity faces them'. This seems natural to the daughter ('strangely apart, yet strangely close

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