Point Of Action In The Yellow Notebook

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Doris Lessing wrote The Golden Notebook in1962. Her work explores the mental and societal breakdown. This epochal novel is considered the greatest work of the celebrated English writer. The book also contains a powerful anti-war and anti-Stalinist message, an extended analysis of communism and the Communist Party in England from the 1930s to the 1950s, and a famed examination of the budding sexual and women's liberation movements. The Golden Notebook has been translated into a number of other languages. In 2005, this novel was chosen by TIME magazine as one of the 100 best English-language novels since 1923.
The novel is about a woman writer who struggles toward living a genuine life in the modern world. This is the focal point of action for
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The entries in these notebooks take up more than three-quarters of the total novel, and they are accountable for the multifaceted composition of the book. The blue notebook is a diary of the daily events of her life. The red notebook is concerned with politics. The black notebook is concerned with her previous life in Africa and with her professional life as a writer. The yellow notebook is for initial drafts and ideas for stories. Entries from all four notebooks are scattered among the sections of ongoing action of the fictional present, the summer of 1957. Those sections constitute a short novel in which the dramatic action revolves around Anna’s life and her relationship with her friend, Molly Jacobs. A few years earlier, Anna and her daughter Janet had shared a house with Molly and her son, Tommy. Anna now lives a half mile away, but the two women continue their close…show more content…
Using the notebooks as a symbolic device, Anna is able to express the variety of moods, memories, thoughts, motives and habits that make her the individual Anna Wulf. Time, place, memory interrupt so that the reader sees not a consistent past that fully explains the present Anna. At last there is also a Golden coloured notebook, in which Anna and her lover give each other sentences to begin a new novel. Anna’s is the first sentence of ‘Free Women’, consequently linking the end of the notebooks to the beginning of the novel ‘The Golden Note Book.’ The fragmentary construction of the novel is in this manner integrated, and turned into a rounded, logical
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