Point Of View In To Kill A Mockingbird

1228 Words5 Pages
Introduction
In the novel To Kill a Mockingbird, Harper Lee uses various different perspectives, all which play an important role in conveying her point to the reader. The dominant point of view is the first person perspective of Scout, a young girl from Alabama. By using an innocent child’s perspective, Harper Lee enables us to see things from other people’s point of view as well, and we get insights into the thoughts of people like her father, Atticus Finch, her brother, Jem Finch, and the local community of Maycomb. She does this by using the child’s view to listen in on conversations, get advice, hear the news and gossip. The novel is also written in the first person, enabling us to read Scout’s inner monologue about the things she hears
…show more content…
Harper Lee uses her to innocence to give the story a twist since Scout is only a very young child. There are multiple instances where here innocence is shown for comedic purposes, for example when she doesn't understand something, like where babies come from, or what snow is. There are also parts where Lee shows the innocence for more serious purposes, like when Scout is confused about the trial and what rape is. One of the important scenes is before Atticus delivers the line “... maybe we need a police force of children.” This is a very clear authoritative voice and shows the great irony in Maycomb, that sometimes children are better at handling conflict that fully grown educated adults. It also shows that the children have no strong political beliefs and that they provide the most honest and unbiased reaction because they are still “human”, and unaffected by the world. It also touches on the subject of peer pressure and the power of a mob, and when Scout goes to talk to Mr. Cunningham about normal everyday things, she ‘brings out the human’ in him. Sometimes, the situation is so difficult and so plainly unfair, and Harper Lee shows that by making Scout (and sometimes Jem and Dill as well) not understand why it's
Get Access