Political and Legal System of Italy

1581 WordsAug 31, 20117 Pages
Political system Italy represents a parliamentary republic with strong Parliament, strict separation of branches of power, titular President and the Government which is very dependent on the parliamentary support. All the above mentioned in fact allows us to consider Italy to be a classical parliamentary republic with all its benefits and disadvantages. Now let's try to describe every key element of political system of Italy. The Italian Parliament is elected once per 5 years and consists of two chambers: the Senate and the Chamber of Deputies having 315 and 630 seats correspondingly. The elections system changed several times, it has different mathematic formulas for each chamber and is quite complicated. The main point is that the…show more content…
More than 50 cabinets of ministers for the 50 years (Louis Gerber, 2000) which have passed after WWII nonetheless did not throw Italy into a political and economical chaos, the country remained one of the key economic players of Europe and the whole world. Another significant conclusion for Coles Supermarkets: no great dependence of economical situation from political events. Legal system Italian legal system belongs to traditional for continental Europe "Civil Law system" based on the historic experience of Roman and German states. It has a clear distinction between Private Law and Public Law, unlike the only Common Law typical for English-speaking countries. The court decisions in Civil Law system are taken within the framework of existing written Codes, in contrast to the Common Law where the previous court decisions are obligatory for the following ones. The fact that the rule of precedent does not apply should be taken into account by Coles Supermarkets in case of any juridical complications arising during opening the business in Italy. The principal document defining political and legal scene of Italy is its written Constitution which has entered into force from January 1, 1948. Fameli and Socci (2005) believe that the Italian Constitution 'clearly states that the rights of individuals exist and are protected, but directs their exercise towards the benefit of the entire collective, according to the principle, also dear to early French Constitution
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