Pop-Music - Beating and Killing Women Essay

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Pop-Music - Beating and Killing Women

     What would happen if you found out that a certain type of food was bad for you; would you stop eating it? Similarly, if you found out a certain type of music was bad for you; would you stop listening to it? Wouldn’t you need proof before you make a decision? John Hamerlinck, a freelance writer in St. Cloud, Minnesota uses this article, “Killing Women: A Pop-Music Tradition”, to make his major point of how popular music is the most common link to violence (241). Hamerlinck voices his concern on the issues of violence in our society and has taken many stands on how violence is generated. Hamerlinck emphasizes that even though the mainstream press seems to have only
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The article was written using outdated songs and without strong supporting evidence. The examples of music he used were from the 1920’s and 1980’s. Hamerlinck’s poor choice in music causes the 1990’s audience to have difficulty relating to the point he was trying to make. Hamerlinck reveals that from the beginning of music there has been an old folk genre known as the “murder ballad,” which tells stories of men killing women because they have “done them wrong” (241). In many of the songs in this genre, the music misrepresents the homicidal lyrics (241). How can this music genre misrepresent homicidal lyrics when it is obvious to the reader that these grouping of words are intended to express hatred toward women, enough to kill them!

     Hamerlinck supports his article with random songs that have to do with violence and love, in hopes of proving that music has an impact on it’s listeners. Lonnie Johnson sang a 1920’s song called “Careless Love,” in which he promises to shoot his lover numerous times and then stand over her until she is finished dying (241). A song like Little Walter’s “Boom, Boom, Out go the Lights” has a harsh and frightening image (241). The listener may not be aware of the destructive words in the songs because of the snappy, up-beat rhythms the artists’ create. I disagree with this statement because if this is the case, how can the listeners really not know what the
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