Post Traumatic Stress Analysis

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The United States has made sure to give veterans the respect and love they need for risking their lives to keep our country and freedoms safe. From national holidays to early retirement, the government has done everything they can to help aid the veterans once they return from combat. However, with the duty of protecting our country comes the risk of veterans’ lives. Even if they survive they will have aliments that will affect them for the rest of their lives. Most of the aliments people associates with veterans returning home from battle are physical, such as losing an arm or a leg. However, the mental effects of war are far more serious than any physical wound a person could ever have. Experiencing the horror of war effects how soldiers…show more content…
A psychological survey from 2015 says that two hundred seventeen thousand Vietnam veterans “may still have full post traumatic stress disorder” a rough eleven percent over the forty year period since the war ended (Handwerk 1). Transitioning from the life of combat back to civilian life is very difficult and most veterans are unable to make the successful transition without some form of medical help. In 1972, the New York Times reported that fifty percent of Vietnam veterans needed professional help to readjust to society (Satel 4). Because most veterans will remain damaged by their war experience are unable to participate in the competitive workplace, post traumatic stress disorder is qualified as a disability by the Untied States government. Thus, the government has tried to give compensation to veterans who suffer from post traumatic stress disorder. Sally Satel in her report “PTSD Diagnostic Trap”…show more content…
According to the Mississippi Scale for Combat-Related PTSD, “about eight percent of veterans have seen significant decreases in their post traumatic stress disorder symptoms over the past decades, however sixteen percent had their symptoms become significantly worse”(Handwerk 2). If double the percentage of veterans who experience their symptoms get better, are having their symptoms worsen over time then obviously the treatments for the disease are not properly working. Even though some anti depressant medicine is prescribed to help ease the symptoms, the most common form of treatment for post traumatic stress disorder is Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT). The most common form of CBT is Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) in which veterans learn to “understand how the trauma changed their thoughts and feelings” (What is PTSD? 3). Psychologist who treat veterans feel that “avoiding fears and trauma perpetuates problems, rather than processes them” which means that by pretending their trauma never happened will lead to the disease worsening, however
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