Postpartum Women: A Case Study

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Postpartum depression (PPD) is the most common complication of childbirth, affecting 10-15% of postpartum women. (Murray & McKinney, 2014) The American Psychiatric Association (2013) defines “peripartum depression” as a period of depression with onset during pregnancy or within 4 weeks after childbirth that lasts at least 2 weeks. Women of all ages, ethnic groups, educational levels, and social status are affected by PPD. According to Murray & McKinney (2014) there are a number of risk factors that contribute to PPD including: depression during pregnancy or previous PPD (strong predictors), first pregnancy, hormonal fluctuations that follow childbirth, medical problems during pregnancy, personality characteristics, marital dysfunction, anger…show more content…
Tandon et al., (2014) even go on to say that in some studies, incidence of PPD symptoms are twice as prevalent in women of low-income socioeconomic status compared to women of higher socioeconomic statuses. A major problem is that PPD often times goes unrecognized and untreated. According to Tandon et al., (2014) only half of women with PPD will receive any type of mental health evaluation or treatment, and that number decreases to less than one-quarter among women diagnosed with depression during pregnancy. This writer finds this baffling since the patient has already been diagnosed, why are they not receiving the proper care need to treat their disease. The positive to this is that according to Tandon et al., (2014) since the disease carries such negative consequences and there is limited success in linking women with needed treatment there are a number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) being conducted that are aimed at preventing PPD. These studies have mostly been aimed at treating PPD rather than preventing it which is the focus in the study done by Tandon et al., (2014) the studies have also yielded mixed…show more content…
According to Murray & McKinney (2014) there is a combination of 3 combined therapies to treat PPD. With psychotherapy, social support, and medication. Murray & McKinney (2014) also believes that if psychotherapy is not effective on its own, it can be combined with medication. High consideration must be taken when prescribing medications to women who are pregnant or breastfeeding. According to Murray & McKinney (2014) a discontinuance in medication for depression during pregnancy are more likely to have a relapse during pregnancy or postpartum. In the evidence by Murray & McKinney (2014) they state that one source found peer support to be an effective prevention strategy against PPD, and one source did not find peer support to be an effective
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