Pre Field Trip Report On The Mediterranean Basin

2005 WordsMar 29, 20159 Pages
Pre Field trip report The Mediterranean basin is a boundary of land that contains a basin of water draining into the Atlantic Ocean. It includes countries from Africa, Asia and Europe and is the largest basin that isn’t an ocean. The basin itself has been shaped due to many different processes and actions but it started during the Triassic like all other oceans and seas formed, by the breaking up of the single supercontinent at that time known as Pangaea. Over time Pangaea began to rift due to activity from within the mantle and as a result what became known as Tethys Sea formed between two new supercontinents; Gondwana and Laurasia - see figure 1 (Earthguide 2007-2008).  Figure 1 : Breaking up of Pangaea (Earthguide 2007-2008) During the Early Cretaceous stage Gondwana broke apart into many of the continents and countries that we know today; one of which being Africa. Africa began to drift North along with India closing up the area we now know as the Mediterranean basin. All of these collisions have shaped the tectonic activity and geo-dynamics of the landscape around the Mediterranean. The Alps were formed as result of the collision between Africa and Eurasia (Hinsbergen et al, 2009). During the Oligocene epoch, the African plate and Eurasian plate moved towards each other putting pressure on one another, and thus the sediment accumulated into folds. This is also called Orogenesis. These folds contain major low angle faults from NE-SE as result of thrusting and
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