Present the way in which imprisonment is presented in The Bell Jar

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Present the way in which imprisonment is presented in The Bell Jar
The bell jar is an inverted glass jar, generally used to display an object of scientific curiosity.

Present the way in which imprisonment is presented in ‘The Bell Jar’

The bell jar is an inverted glass jar, generally used to display an object of scientific curiosity, contain a certain kind of gas, or maintain a vacuum. For Esther, the bell jar symbolizes madness. When gripped by insanity, she feels as if she is inside an airless jar that distorts her perspective on the world and prevents her from connecting with the people around her. At the end of the novel, the bell jar has lifted, but she can sense that it still hovers over her, waiting to drop at any
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She herself says, "I was supposed to be having the time of my life." So why is she so miserable with her success? Why does she feel the need to invent another name for herself, "Elly Higginbottom"? Why does she try to be pals with Doreen?
Why does Esther avoid her magazine work if she really does like her boss, Jay Cee? Does Esther really want to be a writer? What does
Esther want from life? How does she really feel about herself and her world? Does she perceive reality correctly? What kind of change is she going through?

There is contrast between what Esther inner voice is thinking and what she is saying. For example when she talks to Doctor Gordon and her voice reflects on her experience but her inner thoughts are completely different.** Plath reveals and challenges the values of American society in several ways, these include; the sarcastic tone that Esther uses when talking about, ‘All American things’ challenges what is all American. The fig tree where Early in the novel, Esther reads a story about a Jewish man and a nun who meet under a fig tree. Their relationship is doomed, just as she feels her relationship with Buddy is doomed. Later, the tree becomes a symbol of the life choices that face Esther. She imagines that each fig represents a different life. She can only choose one fig, but because she wants all of them, she sits paralyzed with indecision, and the figs rot and fall to the ground and finally though the
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