Prevent Coercive Prayer In Public Schools Essay

1392 Words6 Pages
Prevent Coercive Prayer in Public Schools The First Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America reads: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof." This amendment, commonly called the Establishment Clause, forms the foundation of the right of every American to practice their chosen religion freely and without the interference of the government. In 1947, the Supreme Court issued a statement emphasizing the separation of school and state based on this amendment. Students are entitled to the right to express their religious beliefs in school, but it is unconstitutional for the administration to endorse or discriminate against any religion. Due to…show more content…
     There are several obvious fallacies in this argument. The first is the assumption that morals must be taught in public schools. Many people hold the belief that it is the duty of the students' parents, and not the responsibility of the school system, to teach the students matters of ethics. Another mistake is to assume that a moral law cannot be taught without the use of religion. There are many logical, non-religious reasons for following a moral code that is acceptable to this society. If one does not agree to follow the morals of the rest of the citizens of the U. S., one will quickly be incarcerated. The American people are already under the power of an entity which wields immense power and has the capacity to punish those who do not conform to society's ideals: the federal government.      Often, debaters in favor of coercive prayer in school feel themselves compelled to quote statistics and percentages, a practice which is not usually useful to the debate in general because there is rarely any proof to link the rampant rise of "sin" with the practice of school-endorsed prayer. "Since the court outlawed prayerŠdivorce doubled, teenage
Open Document