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Problem Analysis : Distracted Driving

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Maud Simms COMM-275-910 Part 1 of Final Paper Problem & Audience Analysis Problem Analysis Distracted driving, the act of driving while engaged in other activities, has long been a dangerous epidemic on America’s roadways. While there’s a wide range of activities that distract American drivers, texting while driving has become increasingly prevalent, as the popularity of mobile devices has risen since the 1990s (Noder, 2009). In American culture, which has become ever more dependent on cellphones, many experience the desire to always be accessible – even while on the go (Noder, 2009). This desire, motivated by both social and business objectives, leads many to use their phones behind the wheel. Eighty-five percent of Americans, a number…show more content…
This dangerous conduct is observed amongst younger drivers as well. In a 2009 survey of 16 to 17 year olds, 26% confessed that they have texted while driving (Madden & Lenhart, 2013). The number of Americans who report being in a vehicle while a driver was texting, however, is even higher (Madden & Lenhart, 2013). Half of all American adults and teens aged 12-17 recall having been in a car in which the driver was texting (Madden & Lenhart, 2013). Just under half of all American adults (44%) and teens (40%) say that they have been a passenger in a car where the driver used a phone in a way that put themselves, or others, at risk (Madden & Lenhart, 2013). This shows that the effects of texting and driving span further than individual drivers and surrounding traffic, impacting the lives of many American passengers. Although cellphone use can provide drivers with various benefits, such as optimized commute time, navigation, and entertainment, the risks far outweigh any perceived advantages. Acts of multitasking, such as texting while driving, divides a person’s attention (Konig et al., 2005). This places substantial demand on a person’s restricted cognitive resources (Konig et al., 2005). For example, 14% of all American adults say they’ve physically bumped into another person or an object because talking or texting on their phone distracted them (Madden & Rainie, 2010). This shows that being engrossed by ones cellphone can affect even automatic processes like walking. As
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