Problems Faced by Sociology as a Science and How They Can Be Alleviated

2756 Words May 2nd, 2012 12 Pages
THE UNIVERSTY OF ZAMBIA SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES.
SOCIOLOGY

NAME : EMMANUEL WINA MUSHALA
COMPTER NUMBER : 11067080
COURSE CODE : S 111
LECTURER : MR. MATAA MWIYA
TUTORIAL : MONDAY 14 – 13 HOURS.
DUE DATE : FRIDAY 16TH SEPTEMBER, 2011.
ASSIGNMENT : ONE

QUESTION : WITH EXAMPLES, CRITICALLY DISCUSS THE PROBLEMS FACED BY SOCIOLOGY AS A SCIENCE AND INDICATE HOW SUCH PROBLEMS CAN BE REDUCED OR ALLEVIATED.

This essay is aimed at critically discussing the problems faced by sociology as a science and indicating how such problems can be reduced or alleviated. In order to answer the question at hand, the definitions of sociology, science and alleviate will be
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As a general rule, the higher the proportion of non-responses in the sample, the more likely it is that the survey of those who do take part will be biased.
Even if every attempt is made to reduce bias in the survey, the observations that sociologists make in carrying out a piece of research are likely to reflect their own cultural assumptions. This is the observer bias and it can be difficult, or perhaps impossible to eliminate. (Ibid)

Sociology as a science faces the problem of the inability to rearrange society completely scientific experimentation. In studying society, usually sociology study’s people at all levels but suspends attitudes and morals of people. (Young,1948)
To find out whether a correlation between variables is a casual connection, sociologists use controls. This means some variables have to be held constant in order to look at the effects of others. An example would be in studying the relationship between maternal deprivation in infancy and serious personality problems in adulthood. This could be done by trying to control or ‘screen out’ other possible influences that might explain the correlation. This might prove difficult as the child’s guardian may object to this experiment being carried out on her child. Giddens (2006:84)
According to Giddens, (2006), another problem in sociology is identifying causes as there are a large number of possible causes that could be invoked to explain any given correlation. An example is of how difficult it is to