Project Management Case Study

9557 Words Nov 7th, 2012 39 Pages
Appendix C
Additional Running Cases

INTRODUCTION
These cases are provided here on the companion Web site as additions to the four running cases in Appendix C of the text. Each running case includes five partsinitiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closingwith scenario-based information and several tasks to complete under each part. Several of the tasks involve using templates provided in Appendix D and on this companion Web site. Table D-1 on page 595 of the text summarizes the templates by process group, chapter where used in the text, application software the templates were created in, and the filename of each template. Instructions on using these templates and completed samples are available in the text. Instructors can
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Lori has several strong people in her department, but many of them are unfamiliar with this market and the potential of doing almost all of the marketing for a product over the Internet. Write a one-page job description that would help decide who would be a good candidate for managing this project.
4. Create a weighted scoring model (see the template in Appendix D) that Lori could use to help evaluate candidates for the project manager position. Make up at least five criteria for evaluating the project managers, four potential candidates, and scores for the candidates. Print out the spreadsheet including the chart on one page.
5. Prepare a project charter for the Video Game Market Research Project. Assume the project will take six months to complete and cost about $200,000. Use the project charter template provided in Appendix D.

Part 2: Planning
Scenario
The VP of marketing, Lori, selected Elliot Wood as the project manager for the Video Game Market Research Project. Elliot had previous project management and market research experience within the company, and he also was an avid video game enthusiast. He still had the Atari system he used to play in high school, and he enjoyed playing newer games with his two children. Elliot, however, was wary of doing business on the Internet and refused to make any of his own purchases online. He also did not let his grade school children use the Internet unless they were
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